Ghost Lights

Appearance & summary:
Ghost lights have been seen and recorded in every country and civilization. The mysterious lights are usually seen as white or blue balls or yellow spheres (though occasionally as bobbing candle flames) glowing in the darkness. Although some scientists have suggested that the lights are caused by swamp gas, electricity, magnetism, or some phosphorescent material, so far no definitive natural source has ever been discovered for the sightings. There have been attempts, of course, to trap a ghost light for examination, but pursued, they always seem to be just out of reach. At some point, they acquired the Latin name "ignis fatuus," meaning "foolish fire," because it's considered foolish to try to follow or capture such a phantom light. According to some legends, the light of an ignis fatuus is the ghost of a sinner who is condemned to wander the world for eternity. In parts of Britain, it's sometimes called the will-o'-wisp and is known to be a death omen. Some believe the lights are playful beings, trying to lure travelers to follow them to get them lost in the dark. This type of ignis fatuus is often known, especially in Britain, as the jack-o'-lantern. Legend has it that the light is the soul of a person who's been shut out of both heaven and hell and must roam the earth endlessly. According to the British folk tale about the jack-o'-lantern, Jack was a man so ornery and mean that heaven wouldn't take him and the devil didn't want him.
(submitted by moc.liamlrg|yelleT#moc.liamlrg|yelleT)

Characteristics:
Glowing lights that sometimes appear to blink and are always seen at a distance. Colors are usually white, blue or yellow.

Locations spotted:
Normally seen in remote locations

Speculations:
See beginning statement (Appearance & summary)

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